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Sunday, July 2, 2017

Will You Allow Your Veterinarian To Tell You The Truth?



We use The Oaks Veterinary practice here in Smithfield. I could not imagine having a better team caring for our horses--first rate diagnosticians, completely up to date on research and new findings, and able to handle a horse that is in pain.

One of the reasons that we have as good of a relationship as we do is that they are all completely comfortable in telling me exactly what a horse needs.

For example, if the best treatment for problem is to simply leave it alone and let it get well, they know that I am never going to think that they should instead "do something." If the horse is going to die, they tell me that it is going to die. If there are range of treatments out there they explain each and they know that after I have all of that information I will let them know which way I want to go.

I will never say "do what you think is best." That is  unfair to a vet. When the vet has explained the pluses and minuses of every option and asks you what you want done--take the responsibility to make that informed decision.

Don't just position yourself to be able to set back and say, "I did everything the vet said to do and my horse still died!"

The test of the quality of a horse owner as a client is simple. Would the client seek another vet if their vet looked them in the eye and said, "The problem is that your horse is 300 pounds over weight and the diet and lack of exercise that you are providing him will likely drastically shorten his life and will likely lead to horrific pain from laminitis and then full blown founder."?

Do you care enough about your horse to accept the vet's advice that what your horse needs to be healthier is exercise, good hay, water and companionship or are you going to feel cheated if the vet does not leave you with a string of supplements and prescription drugs for your horse?

Your horse needs a first rate vet. Even more importantly, your horse needs for you to be a first rate client.

(The picture above is of Burns Red, son of El Rosio, and one of the few high percentage Bacca colts in existence.  Lloyd is a veteran, not a veterinarian--but its still a great picture.)

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

I am a small animal veterinarian, I own no horses and do not work on them. I just wanted to let you know this is the best thing I have read in a long time. Many animals would be healthier and my stress level would be significantly reduced if everyone thought this way. Thank you.

George W said...

The vets are great...

The little stud has the spirit, and intelligence of his parents....One of the best things I have ever done was to let the little booger be a kid until it was time for him to start learning....I think he will be all the better for it.

kelly hardee said...

When you have vets as good as mine, hard decisions are a
lot easier. I've had the same vets for 20+ years at Greenville Mobile Equine and couldn't be more appreciative. Wish everyone could have great vets.